Bread City Basketball


Best Side
February 1, 2012, 9:14 am
Filed under: Bread City, New York City, Photography, Poetry | Tags: , ,

Hot bowl of pastina,
23rd Street and the river.
Subway grime patina,
shout to chopped liver.

Chelsea Penthouse NYC Photo
photo by Stephan Alessi



FORTUNE COOKIE WISDOM

FORTUNE COOKIE HUSTLING

BASKETBALL BY NICOLE COHEN



UPPER WEST SIDE, 2005
May 28, 2009, 12:41 am
Filed under: Bread City, New York City, Photography, Poetry | Tags: , ,

up on riverside and ninety-five
sidewalk heat
3 bags of lye
2 girls on a stoop
waiting for the bus
1 had a tennis racket
so we lit up the dutch.

nyc summer
photo by AC Berkheiser
CLICK HERE for full size



THE FULTON MALL

suitcases packed with cigarettes
new sneakers sealed in plastic
men hustling umbrellas
hoping for the storm to break

FULTON MALL GOLD
photo by Bonnie Natko



GARLIC KNOTS

Garlic knots just don’t get the respect that they deserve. You forget all about them until the day that you’re hungry but you’ve only got a dollar, which is about fifty cents short of a slice. Everybody knows that knots are 3 for $1. That’s the universally accepted garlic knot price point, and it isn’t going anywhere. The knots are putting in work every day, making the pizzeria smell good, taking up the empty space on the counter, soaking through the wax paper with oil and parmesan, and you’re going to tell me that they’re less important than calzones? Get that out of here.

Garlic knots were invented in 1973 in Ozone Park, Queens. It’s hard to pinpoint the exact location, because garlic knots were sort of a simultaneous invention, like the telephone, and they spread like wildfire. The goal was to find a way to re-use the leftover scraps of pizza dough, so it wouldn’t go to waste. The result was the most greasy, the most pungent and the most delicious $1 worth of food to ever get pushed over a cash register. Let me get 6, and sprinkle some red pepper on that too.

MEET ME AT THE KNOT SPOT, SON!

carlic knots



WEST 4TH STREET BASKETBALL

SUMMER BASKETBALL
photo by Horatio Baltz