Bread City Basketball


LIBRARY SWAG
September 26, 2011, 7:41 am
Filed under: Bread City, Fiction | Tags: , ,

Never say more than is necessary.
– Elmore Leonard

swag origins, elmore leonard, ryan's rules

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BALLER IN THE RYE

I once sat next to Ackley at this basketball game. We had a terrific guy on the team, Howie Coyle, that could sink them from the middle of the floor, without even touching the backboard or anything. Ackley kept saying, the whole goddam game, that Coyle had a perfect build for basketball. God, how I hate that stuff.
– From Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger.

Lebron James is one part Coyle, one part Caulfield. Haters are his phonies.

jd salinger, lebron james, basketball, literature



Been A Long Time
January 19, 2008, 1:33 am
Filed under: Bread City, Fiction

Been a long time since I posted up on Bread City Basketball. I’ve been grinding on grad school and next week, I’m going to be teaching an undergraduate class at Brooklyn College. Too crazy. Meanwhile, my little publishing company is finally ready to put our first book!

TWO ADVENTURES includes eye popping artwork and two childhood adventure stories by myself and my friend Sam Decker featuring: danger, canoes, weird hermits, baseball, dogs, guns, and Hawaii.

You can buy it here.

basketball book



ISIAH THOMAS IN CANCUN
October 29, 2007, 11:02 am
Filed under: Basketball, Bread City, Fiction, Isiah Thomas | Tags: ,

I’m excited to announce that the world’s most far-out basketball blog, Free Darko, has published another one of my stories, an homage to Isiah Thomas and Donald Barthelme. You’re probably coming from there already, but if not, check it out!


See MORE ISIAH ART and MORE OF MY BASKETBALL  FICTION



NEVER MISS
October 26, 2007, 1:00 am
Filed under: Basketball, Bread City, Fiction, Photography | Tags: ,

I was the most dedicated basketball player. I don’t say the best. In my mind I was terrifically good. In fact I was simply the most dedicated basketball player in the world. I say this because I played continuously, from the time I discovered the meaning of the game at the age of ten, until my mid-twenties. I played outdoors on cement, indoors on wood. I played in heat, wind, and rain. I played in chilly gymnasiums. Walking home, I played some more. I played during dinner, in my sleep, in movies, in automobiles and buses, and at school. I played for over a decade, taking every conceivable shot, with either hand, from every direction. Masses cheered my performance. No intermission, no food, no other human concern, year after year they cheered me on. In living rooms, subways, movies, and schoolyards I heard them. During actual basketball games I also played basketball. I played games within games. When I lost my virginity I eluded my opponent and sank a running hook. Masses saw it happen. I lost my virginity and my girl lost hers. The game had been won. I pulled up my trousers. She snapped her garter belt. I took a jump shot from the corner and another game was underway. I scored in a blind drive from the foul line. We kissed good night. The effect was epileptic. Masses thrashed in their seats, loud holes in their faces. I acknowledged with an automatic nod and hurried down the street, dribbling. A fall-away jumper from the top of the key. It hung in the air. Then, as if sucked down suddenly, it zipped through the hoop. Despite the speed and angle of my shots, I never missed.

Basketball Player by Leonard Michaels

suburban basketball nostalgia



The Church

In a lull, though it rarely occurs, you can hear the squeak of tennis shoes against the floor. Then the yelling begins again, and then continues; fathers, mothers, neighbors joining in to form a single pulsing ululation—a cry of the whole community—for in this gymnasium each body becomes the bodies beside it, pressed as they are together, thigh to thigh, and the same shudder runs through all of them, and runs toward the same release. Only the ball moves serenely through this dazzling din. Obedient to law it scarcely speaks but caroms quietly and lives at peace.

– Excerpted from In The Heart of the Heart of the Country by William H. Gass



CHEERING IN THE DARK
August 24, 2007, 11:04 am
Filed under: Basketball, Bread City, cheerleaders, Fiction, Photography | Tags:

WHAM! Bread City just double scooped you with the photo of the year. For everyone that’s coming over here for the first time via my short story on Free Darko, what’s up!

cheerleaders flip

photo by listen missy