Bread City Basketball


KNICKS VS. BULLS BRAWL, 1994

It’s the Eastern Conference Semifinals, and the Knicks are rocking black sneakers for good luck. This is their shot. 1994: the year without Jordan. New York has to win now, while they can. Because whatever little fantasy MJ is living out at that moment – pretending to be a baseball player, Indian chief, astronaut, or whatever – they all know it won’t last.

And the Knicks are winning the series 2-0, when the scuffle breaks out between Derek Harper and Jo Jo English in Game 3. These teams hate one another. Pippen and Charles Smith had technical fouls before the game even started. Now the benches clear quick.

The fight goes down to the ground on some bad jiujitsu. Arms and legs everywhere. John Starks is about to throw a punch when Phil Jackson grabs him from behind. They both get tackled into the stands, and security bodies Starks up. Ewing and Pippen play the old hold me back, hold me back game. And Pat Riley’s not even mad until Derek Harper puts hands on coach’s suit.

But the best part? David Stern sits a few mere rows from the melee. He’s literally close enough to reach out and break up the fight himself, but he can’t move. The commissioner just stares, bug-eyed, into his own personal slow motion disaster reel, as both teams crush the heavy spenders sitting courtside.

New York went on to win the series in 7 games, and Jordan returned to basketball the following season.



DEFINITION OF LINSANITY

via Got’em Coach a.k.a. the director.



BILL BRADLEY: BASKETBALL POET

What attracted me was the swish, the sound of the dribble, the feel of going up in the air. You don’t need eight others, like in baseball. You don’t need any brothers or sisters. Just you. I wonder what the guys are doing back home. I’d like to be there, but it’s as much fun here, because I’m playing. It’s getting dark. I have to go back for dinner. I’ll shoot a couple more. Feels good. A couple more.
- From A Sense of Where you Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton, by John McPhee

The Knicks stole Bill Bradley in the 1965 NBA Draft. There was no frozen envelope, just a now-obscure rule known as the Territorial Pick. Between 1950 and 1966, NBA teams had first dibs on drafting any college player within 50 miles.

Bradley had graduated from Princeton as the Associated Press Player of the Year, the NCAA Tournament’s Most Outstanding Player, and a two-time First Team All-American. And since Princeton, New Jersey is 1 mile closer to New York City than to Philadelphia, the Knicks were able to scoop Bradley away from the 76ers as a Territorial Pick.

The rest is history: Bradley played with New York for his entire basketball career – save for one season with Olimpia Milano – and his #24 jersey was retired by the Knicks in 1984.

Bill Bradley Knick



Woody Allen on Earl Monroe

“What makes Monroe different is the indescribable heat of genius that burns deep inside him. Some kind of diabolical intensity comes across his face when he has the ball. One is suddenly transported to a more primitive place…It’s amazing, because the audience’s “high” originates inside Monroe and seems to emerge over his exterior.
- Woody Allen, Sport Magazine, Nov. 1977.

Allen is sent by the once-great Sport to interview Earl Monroe for a cover story. But Pearl never shows and Allen is left to make small talk with “Earl’s lady.” A true fan, Woody swallows the snub and writes a great profile of the arthritic Knicks captain anyway, full of signature wit and basketball wisdom.

I read a transcript of the article once before, but never saw the original scans until yesterday, thanks to the excellent Oakley & Allen. True holy grail status! Check it out.

Earl Monroe photographed by Jim Cummins



WOODY AND THE KNICKS

In 1971 I wrote and shot a scene for Annie Hall involving the Knicks and Earl The Pearl. I was extolling the concept of the physical over the cerebral, so I wrote a fantasy basketball game in which all the great thinkers of history – Kant and Nietzsche and Kirkegaard – played against the Knicks. I cast actors who looked like those philosophers to play those roles and they played against the real Knicks. We used the players on the team at that time including Earl, Bill Bradley and Walt Frazier, and we shot it inside Madison Square Garden after the last game of the season. Of course the Knicks were smooth and beat the philosophers easily; all their cerebration was impotent against the Knicks. But I cut the scene from the picture, not because it didn’t come out but because I had to keep the picture moving and it was too much of a digression. It didn’t break my heart not to use it in the film. I always feel that anything I cut out of a film is always a mercy killing.
- Woody Allen, The Observer Sport Monthly, 1/6/02

Another example of the profound cultural impact the Knicks had on New York during the early 1970s. Willis Reed and company brought pro hoops to the forefront of the city’s popular consciousness for the first time, winning two championships along the way. Before then, the NBA wasn’t really legit in NYC, and people only cared about college ball.

It was the most volatile era in New York’s modern history. A time of grime and racial tension. Crime skyrocketing. Junkies ruling the parks. Student protestors and construction workers brawling on Wall Street. The South Bronx burning down to rubble. Cops with German Shepherds patrolling the graffiti-covered subway cars.

And yet amidst all the antipathy, the entire city was united in its passion for the Knicks. It wasn’t because of one or two individual players. It was because together, the Knicks’ game aesthetically complemented New York so perfectly. A melting pot of styles, races, and personalities that melded to form an unstoppable team. Flashy at times, but blue collar at heart, with a deep bench that could outlast top-heavy teams like Wilt Chamberlain’s Lakers.

All that remains of Woody Allen’s 1971 Knicks footage is the still frame below. It was used as a lobby card during Annie Hall‘s original theatrical run. According to Allen, the rest of the scene was destroyed.

woody allen knicks annie hall



SO MANY DEGREES

From the deep archives. Of course 9-year-old me had to sign it to be official. Featuring original bulletin board pushpin holes and Herb William’s signature. Knicks put up 130 on the 76ers. Frame-worthy.

1990s knicks rule



GALLO COUTURE
September 12, 2011, 1:17 am
Filed under: Art, Basketball, Bread City, Denver Nuggets, New York Knicks | Tags: , ,

Il Gallo T-Shirt design, 2010. It was made for Gallinari the Knick, but he’s #8 in Denver so the shirt works if you’re a Nugs fan. I’m still in denial about the Carmelo trade.

Danilo Gallinari Nickname Shirt

CHECK OUT THE T-SHIRT HERE



CRYBURY

Stephon Marbury’s internet livecam is 100% the best reason for the internet.  In case you forgot: this guy once ran the floor in the Garden. Now there is a 24/7 window into the depths of his basketball-free bad judgment and paranoia. I’ve been dreaming of a show like this for years.

With just a little clicking around youtube highlights you can see him blazing roaches in the back of the black Phantom, getting into car accidents, eating Vaseline, and running his mouth way too much in sporting goods stores, in no particular order. But who cares about highlights? As long as this thing exists, I am watching live.



KNICKS VS. SUNS BRAWL, 1993

Warmup windbreakers tearing, assistant coaches flying everywhere. Greg Anthony snuffs KJ, and still keeps his silk shirt fresh, pre-dress code. Starks does his signature fight move, a.k.a forehead-to-forehead trash talking. Even Rolando Blackman gets up off the bench looking for some, so you know it’s good.

At the time, Phoenix and New York were the two best teams in their respective divisions. The league handed out $160,000 in fines.

The brawl doesn’t really get going until the 4:00 minute mark, but it’s worth watching the fight-before-the-fight, if only to see how funny Danny Ainge looks when he’s mad.

Gotta love the clean deco lines on that 90s Suns court design.



HUG THE BLOCK LIKE MARBURY

“I don’t like nostalgia unless it’s mine.” – Lou Reed


via STRIVING FOR PERFECTION



EWING CROSS
March 11, 2009, 10:19 am
Filed under: Art, Basketball, Bread City, New York Knicks | Tags: , ,

Conceptual Art, New York Knicks, Patrick Ewing on a cross by Alex Goldberg and Drew Blatman

by Alex Goldberg and Drew Blatman
SEE ALSO



D.I.Y. LARRY JOHNSON

STEP ONE: Click here for large version of pic, and print out.

STEP TWO: Glue to card stock, and cut out head.

STEP THREE: Cut out Larry Johnson’s eyes, and glue a piece of gold foil to his tooth.

STEP FOUR: Affix to a popsicle stick.

STEP FIVE: Go out into the world as Larry Johnson, hero of ’99 Knickdom and one-time Family Matters guest star.



ASCII CHRIS DUDLEY

Chris Dudley, My Favorite Scrub, 1990s Knicks
YEAH, THAT’S RIGHT. Please refer to this definitive article for more on one of the best Knick scrubs of all time. A.K.A. Chris Studley.